Where Science meets Society

The long path from dream to reality

The long path from dream to reality

At the first ScienceNight to be organized by Novartis in French-speaking Switzerland, 200 guests met the aeronautical pioneer Bertrand Piccard on November 7 in Montreux, where Piccard spoke in a relaxed atmosphere about his Solar Impulse project. Under the motto “Make a dream come true”, Country President of Novartis Switzerland Pascal Brenneisen first presented a short film about the long journey from basic research to the development of a new medicine, before he handed over to Bertrand Piccard, who took up the idea and recounted his own journey from vision to the crossing of America.

Read more: The long path from dream to reality

Against myths and monocultures

Against myths and monocultures

With the German food chemist and nutrition expert Udo Pollmer and the Swiss agricultural historian Peter Moser, two leading scientists took part in the latest Science Night event, which addressed the subject of Nature and Nutrition. This was already the fourth “science slam” since it was first launched in the summer of 2012, and the event is attracting ever more followers who enjoy the entertaining discussion format, which was held this time under the title “You are what you eat”. The event took place –to the delight of the participants --in the idyllic nature park Lange Erlen, where the 60 or so invited guests and the two top-flight speakers could escape the tropical summer heat that had turned the city into an incubator as the relaxed in the secluded greenery of the park.

Read more: Against myths and monocultures

Venturing along the double helix

Venturing along the double helix

J. Craig Venter, one of the world’s leading scientists, visited the Novartis Campus in Basel last January to talk about cutting-edge DNA research. He was the special guest of the Science Nights event celebrating the 60th anniversary of the discovery of the double helix and commemorating the fact that DNA research was kick-started a stone’s throw away from Basel in 1869 when Swiss scientist Friedrich Miescher became the first researcher to isolate the substrate of heredity. In an entertaining panel talk with FMI director Susan Gasser and Rino Rappuoli from Novartis, Venter also discussed the future of science and medicine and referred to the strong collaboration with Novartis, which led to the development of Bexsero®, the recently approved meningococcal vaccine.

Read more: Venturing along the double helix